Payday Loans: When to Just Say No

There is a certain allure to getting a guaranteed payday loans direct lenders to fulfill your immediate desires and “needs,” say, scoring tickets to see your favorite basketball team or that rare chance to go see The Rolling Stones live in concert! You might even be one of those people who must have the latest gadget and sees getting the newest version of the iPhone on the first day it is released as a serious priority. In fact, when you learn that you can have cold hard cash in your hands within a matter of minutes, you may rush to your nearest payday loan office and start fulfilling fantasies immediately.

We know you’ve thought about it, and we’re here to say stop! Before you sign up for a payday loans with bad credit guaranteed approval with fees attached, take a moment to examine your priorities. Payday loans are really for financial emergencies and rough spots. Although your desire to impress your hot date with an Armani suit and a new hair cut may seem like an emergency, it isn’t, nor are those strappy Christian Leboutin heels you simply must have.

A financial emergency can take a number of different forms, and with this economy, you certainly shouldn’t eliminate the option of a payday loan. If you’ve written a check that is going to bounce unless you get some cash into your checking account immediately, it’s a good time to get a payday loan. Check bouncing fees are enormous, and you can usually get a much better deal from a trusted payday loan provider. If your utilities will be shut off unless you pay your bills quickly, it may be time to consider a payday loan. Also, if something is preventing you from doing your job and getting paid, perhaps your car has broken down or the breaks need to be fixed, then you should think about getting a payday loan.

There are a number of different situations where a payday loan might come in handy. We simply advise you to take the time to evaluate whether you are undergoing a financial crisis or you’re just really longing for a new big-screen TV before you contact a provider.

I also remember that in a gubernatorial election in my home state

I had a bumper sticker endorsing the Democratic candidate on my private vehicle (not used EVER for business reasons). My boss told me that his upline Diamond (who is his son in law btw) told me I had to take it down because this candidate “didn’t support free enterprise.” >>

I’ve got news for him: NEITHER DOES AMWAY!!!!!!!!

I’ve said it already, and I’ll say it again:VOTSs give capitalism a bad, bad name. The fraud, abuse and misleading statements would be totally unnecessary if VOTSs actually practiced the essence of free enterprise, which is the *trader principle*. Two people who trade things of comparable value end up both being better off after the trade. Not so with VOTS, where a few at the top use an avalanche of lies large and small to drain the many at the bottom.

<< I consulted the ACLU, but this being Texas, there was nothing I could do complaint wise. Kicking myself now for not taking it to the media, but I was too brainwashed to make a stand. >>

I think this idea of giving the VOTSs bad press is the best strategy we have right now for consumer activism. I try to warn people whenever I can to “stay away from VOTS”.

The most telling of the VOTSers’ tactics is their consistent evasion of demands to show us their cash flow statements. If you ever want to shut up a recruiter, just tell him you won’t even look at the “opportunity” unless he shows you *his* cash flow statement.

I was involved with the NWTW for about 3 months

And lost a great deal of money…over $25,000!

And are they a legal? Well, even though they are all Herbalife Distributors, this system does not “promote” retailing. They try to make you believe you are retailing but in reality the focus of the MLM is recruiting. The Herbalife products are purchased by the new distributors that are recruited into the system to get to the supervisor level. Then the products these new distributors purchased are used to be sent to the next new distributors they sign up as part of their “distributorship”. And so on, and so on, and so on…It then “looks” like you are retailing because those purchases count towards your “volume” because they are in your downline but in reality there are no “customers” involved.

How long was your fiance involved?

NWTW / successful prosecutions?

Does anyone know a successful prosecution of a quasi-VOTS (such as NWTW) for fraud or deceptive marketing or anything else? According to the Massachusetts BBB, NWTW isn’t techinically/legally a pyramid scheme because it sells a product — distributor kits — but obviously the kits are the only thing that keeps this on the legal side of the VOTS/pyramid scheme legal divide. Still, it seems clear the NWTW — and others, I’m sure — thrive on deceptive practices (bs “disclaimers” notwithstanding). With the help of some of her close friends, I have managed to “rescue” my fiancee from NWTW while she was only out $2k; clearly there are many other horror stories. Is a class-action lawsuit or criminial prosecution possible? Seeking thoughts, esp. from legal eagles out there.